Workshop Season in Full Swing

Wow!

That went fast. It seems like just yesterday we were finishing up our last Night Photography workshop of 2018. Getting home taking a break and making final plans for the 2019 season and now it’s here.  I was in Moab, Utah last week kicking off the first workshop of the season.  I had a great group of students who were passionate about learning all they could about night photography.

Sharkfin MIlky Way
Nikon D850 – Sigma 14mm 1.8 Art

It’s possible that this may be the last year we are allowed to use Low Level Lighting to illuminate our foregrounds. The Parks are proposing a change to this rule that will ban all forms of artificial lighting except when moving from one location to the other.  I don’t want to start a discussion about that on my blog, I am simply stating what I have heard and seen in emails from the Parks.

Low Level Lighting is one of the things we love to teach so that our students can go out after the workshop and do it on their own in their own hometowns or when they travel.

If the ban does come into effect for the 2020 season we do have a plan. Another aspect of our classroom training during the workshop is Planning and Scouting. We teach you how to plan your shot based on what you want to accomplish. Next year is when we will be putting into practice what we have been teaching and using ourselves for years. We don’t want our students going home with great skies and black foregrounds. We want nicely lit foregrounds to go with our wonderful skies. This is something we will plan for before setting the dates for 2020.

Path to the Milky Way
Nikon D850 – Sigma 20mm 1.4 Art

The above image does not use any Low Level Lighting. All the light you see is natural. These are techniques we teach so that you can make the most from any shooting situation. Just because the skies are dark and there may not be any moonlight does not mean you can’t get great images. It just takes a little more time in the field shooting but the results are well worth the effort.  Do you think this image would look as good if the entire foreground was just dark?

Corona Pano
Nikon D810 – Sigma 20mm 1.4 Art – 6 vertical images stitched for pano

Corona Arch is a fairly popular spot but because it’s outside the National Parks near Moab, it sees much fewer people at night than other places like Delicate Arch. On this particular night we took our group up during a time when we had good moonlight. We timed it so that we could hike up in the moonlight, get set up and then the moon would set and the skies would get dark. I shot this image just as we arrived and our students were getting set up to help show what kind of illumination you can get from the moon. Once your eyes adjust in the moonlight it’s actually pretty easy to see and only minimal light should be used for safety reasons. This really allows us to have our senses be in tune with what is around us and it causes our hearing to be more sensitive as well.

OOF
Nikon D850 – Sigma 50mm 1.4 Art

What is the absolute most crucial part of Night Photography? Yes, it’s focusing (right after safety)  and how to properly focus in the dark. It doesn’t do you any good to go out in perfect conditions only to come home with blurry images. To the untrained eye it may be hard to see if your images are in focus or not just by looking at the back of the LCD on your camera. We teach you how to properly focus in the dark so that you get sharp images every time. There are a lot of things you can fix with Photoshop but an out of focus image isn’t one of them!

DS
Nikon D810 – Sigma 20mm 1.4 Art – Image is at 300% crop

Part of our classroom training focuses on Noise Reduction, it’s actually a fairly big part of the classroom training because, let’s be honest, who wants to go out and shoot awesome scenes at night only to end up with grainy and noisy images….Not me!  While I can’t take all the credit for figuring out some of the techniques we teach, I can say I do a lot of trial and error work to find the best and most efficient ways to do them. If you look on the right side of the image above you will see what looks like confetti sprinkled on the image. Now, look at the left side and you wont see it. You may be asking yourself, “how long did it take him to remove all that with the clone took or healing brush?” The answer, about 5 seconds max and I did not use either one of those tools…  We want the fun of photography to be out in the field, in nature, photographing the scenes you love without having to worry about spending countless hours cleaning up your images once you are home. We show you how to do this and in fact it’s so easy you’ll probably be mad at us because we don’t take longer to explain the process…trust me when I say the process is only 5 mouse clicks from start to finish!

Moab Group 2018 September

Arches Group May 25 2017

Mike and I love our workshop groups. Many of the students take multiple workshops with us in various locations as we expand our locations over time. Before we even released our 2019 Yellowstone workshop we had 3 students who were on a workshop in Moab sign up.

I am home now till the end of April when I head back to Moab for 2 weeks to help teach 5 back to back workshops.  We have filled 59 of 60 spots and have 1 spot left on our May 9-13th Night Photography Workshop

We also have some openings in June as well as August and September. These months make it a bit easier on the body since the Milky Way is up right after sunset.  We sure hope you will consider joining us under the starry skies.

I love hearing your feedback, questions or comments so please feel free to use the contact box below.

 

Links to products used in the making of these images.

Sigma Lenses

Nitecore Lights

Nikon Cameras

 

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