So Far in 2019…………

I know we are only into the new year by just over a month but I thought it would be fun to share some of my work so far this year. I have been trying to make the most of my free time by getting out and shooting. As a full-time photographer it can be pretty easy to just sit in the house and edit and catch up on social media. While those are parts of the process, the process I really enjoy is being outside and capturing the images. I wont share all my new images, just the parts that will put it all together.

In early January I hosted my annual “Oregon Coast Winter Workshop” in Yachats, Oregon. Our group all had Oceanfront rooms at the amazing Overleaf Lodge and Spa

We were truly blessed with good weather. The few days before the workshop was rainy and right after the workshop the rain came back. We just happened to time it so that the 4 days during the workshop were in between storms.  Needless to say this made the workshop students happy as well as myself. My friend, Chuck Rasco of Chuck Rasco Photography always comes along on these trips with me. After the workshop was over we spent the next 5 days on the southern Oregon Coast between Bandon and Brookings. We had a good and bad weather in both places. Having lived in Oregon most my life, I felt right at home walking along the beaches in the rain. We did some crazy hikes too.

Scale
Seal Rock Sunset, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105

On Saturday night of the workshop I took the group down to the Seal Rock area near Newport, Oregon. Once we parked the cars I could see the clouds in the sky and I had a feeling that the sunset was going to be epic.  I decided to grab just my camera and one lens, my workhorse, Sigma 24-105mm Art to use for some snapshots while helping the students. Right on cue, the sky just began to explode with color. Everyone was going crazy trying to find the best comps. Moving around and making sure they were not in each other’s way, the group really worked well together. Gary Kochel planned a big northwest trip around the workshop and I think it’s easy to say that he was extremely impressed with Oregon. Here is Gary getting an epic shot from his own vantage point.

Moving down the coast after the workshop, we headed directly to Brookings and had plans to stay in Bandon on the way back up. My friend Chuck and his wife Cathy had never really explored the Samuel Boardman State Park area of Oregon. I felt as a good host, I should show them around properly. That means with a few steep hikes that lead to incredible views.

Natural Bridges
Natural Bridges, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105

The first hike was at Natural Bridges. It’s a pretty common spot for good reason, the views are amazing. Not everyone can get down to see the views from here just because it’s pretty steep. This view isn’t too bad to get to but once you go further, down to the red arrow, it gets much steeper. So steep that there is a 50ft section where you need to repel down the hill with a rope…Once we were set up at the red arrow the views were just as good.

Pacific Views
Pacific Views, Nikon D850, Sigma 14mm 1.8 Art

It was right here when I realized that Chuck wasn’t too keen on heights. The Sigma 14mm 1.8 Art makes this little path look wider than it actually is. Chuck was standing almost right next to me on my right and my left tripod leg is actually off the path, down a little ways being held up by a rock. The top of the arch that we are on is maybe 4ft across. That doesn’t leave much room for error when packing up your gear and turning around to head back up the trail.

Cliffside Views
Cliffside Views, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105, Haida 10 stop ND Filter

It’s fun to shoot the same scene with various lenses. You simply get different results. This was shot from the same place, tripod in the same spot, as the last image but with a Sigma 24-105mm Art at 52mm for 67 seconds with a Haida 10 stop ND Filter

Sunset Storm at Face Rock
Sunset Storm at Face Rock, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105 Art

After powering though a few days of pouring rain in Brookings and filling up on the best breakfasts ever (we ate here 3 days in a row) Mattie’s Pancake House we made our way up the coast to Bandon. Bandon is not an open book by any means. I have been visiting Bandon now for over 10 years, maybe longer and the weather is always interesting. After getting checked into our hotel and picking up some provisions for the evening the rain started. It was windy, blowing sideways and I was thinking that our chance for a sunset was out the window…literally. As it got closer to sunset the rain let up, the sky started to break up with a few holes in the clouds. We made our way across the street to the beach in amazement that our timing couldn’t have been more perfect. The wind was still kicking pretty good so I decided to put the tripod away and shoot handheld with the Sigma 24-105. The OS on this lens is incredible. We were down on the beach for about 2 hours until sunset was finally over. There were no chance of shooting stars that night so we called it a night and began walking back to our hotel… I kid you not, just as we got back to the hotel it started pouring again.

Super Blood Wolf Moon
Super Blood Wolf Moon, Nikon D850, Sigma 20mm 1.4 & Sigma 85mm 1.4

Months ago, I planned a shoot with a friend who was interested in shooting the Blood, Super Wolf Moon on the night of the 20th of January. We used PhotoPills to plan the shoot and know where exactly the moon was going to be at what time when it was eclipsed.  Since I was just getting home from 10 days in Oregon, I didn’t want to travel too far from home. South Valley Park is right behind my house and because we are looking away from Denver the sky is a little darker.  Using these rocks as a foreground subject, we set up, shot the foreground and then waited for the moon to turn red. Because it’s impossible to capture the moon and the foreground all in one shot with the proper exposure, I used 2 shots for this image. The Moon is in the exact location it was when I shot the foreground. I used the Sigma 20mm for the foreground and the 85mm for the moon. A quick blend in Photoshop to bring the two together was all it took to create this image as I saw it with my own eyes.

Since being home from Oregon, I have been jumping all over Colorado searching for fun and interesting photos. If you have been following me for any amount of time, you will know that I am really intrigued by the smaller towns on the Eastern Plains of the state. On a trip out near Matheson, Colorado with my friend, Tony Lazzari we found this beautiful old seed mill.

Manaville Seed
Manaville Seed, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105mm Art

The light was just coming up over the horizon hitting the metal siding. There were just enough clouds in the sky to make good use of my Haida 10 stop ND Filter and create this really long exposure of 2 minutes. I was able to get the camera low enough so that I was looking up, by doing this I was able to include much more of the sky.

Schoolhouse Spins
Schoolhouse Spins, Nikon D850, Sigma 14mm 1.8 Art

This old one room schoolhouse sits out in the middle of nowhere. In fact I have only seen a couple pictures of it online. It’s 150 miles from my house. While Bob Coorsen and I were setting up, a truck pulled up and asked where we were from. We told him and then he proceeded to tell us how his grandfather and father both attended school here back in the day. I have searched high and low and I can’t find any information on this school. The mad did say that a few years back he was going to buy it and put a new roof on it but something fell through and he never was able to make the purchase. The school is maybe 15 ft wide by 40 ft long. It’s really small. I used a Nitecore LA30 to illuminate the inside of the school. The image is a blend of 2 shots. keeping the camera in the exact same position I did one long exposure for the star trails and then a short exposure for the points of light stars. I simply used a blending mode in Photoshop and changed the opacity to blend the long exposure with the short exposure so that you can see both in the sky. I masked out the foreground so that only the long exposure for the school shows. This allows me to keep image quality at it’s best.

Train Station Tuesday
Train Station Tuesdays, Nikon D850, Sigma 14mm 1.8 Art

I don’t venture down into the city too often. After some good snow and a warming up it’s easy to find puddles to shoot unique perspectives. It has been a while since I visited Union Station and I remember that the concrete wasn’t level. This means that pools of water form. With no wind it makes it easy to get some fun shots. Here I had the camera sitting on the ground behind held up by my L-Bracket. Using a Sigma 14mm lens really let me get quite a bit in the shot even though I was so close. The lens is really only an inch or 2 off the ground from the water.

Morning Mass in the fog
Morning Mass in the fog, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105mm Art

Weather, in my opinion, is the most important factor in photography. It can be a make it or break it kind of thing. It can also give you images you never imagined you would get. Thus being the case here. My plan was to shoot this old church (1913) with the Milky Way rising up in front of it. The way it faces, I would need to shoot it from the backside. I arrived here early afternoon, met with the guy who owns the farm next to it. He was leaving for the day and I told him I would probably be out there shooting all night and that if he saw some lights, not to be alarmed, it would just be me. About 10pm I started shooting. I was doing star trails, shooting Orion, the Big dipper and getting pretty excited for the Milky Way that was going to be coming up around 5am. At 2am I hopped back in my Jeep to warm up and grab a quick nap. When I woke up at 4am I could not see any stars….I was puzzled..I turned my lights on and it was solid fog. I thought to myself, “well, hopefully it will go away in time”.  That was not the case. The fog began to freeze on everything (hoar frost). I soon realized that not only was I not going to shoot the Milky Way, I also wasn’t going to get a sunrise. About 6am it was light enough to get back out and shoot what I could. I actually really enjoyed the fog and the beautiful atmosphere it created. Living in Oregon I saw fog all the time. Since moving to Colorado almost 6 years ago, I rarely see it here…

Corn Stalk Tree Fog Color
Foggy Tree, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105mm Art

I could have shot scenes like this all day long. If you follow me on either Facebook or Instagram you can see more of these foggy moody images in the near future. They are a nice change of pace from my normal stuff. I hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed shooting them.

Iced
Iced, Nikon D850, Sigma 24-105mm Art

Last but not least…Boulder Canyon Falls recently opened back up to the public after being closed off. I am not sure what the reason was or for how long it was closed. I do know that in the 6 years I have lived in Colorado, I had not been to it. Odd because it’s only 31 miles from my house. Tony Lazzari and I decided to go check it out…The falls were half-frozen when we were there and I was able to find some intimate scenes like this that showed both the flowing water and the frozen water. Because the falls are in a canyon, the sun rarely hits on them directly this time of year. Getting a good exposure was very easy due to the flat lighting. The mist from the falls had frozen on the ground but being the cautious person I am, I decided to not get too close and chance falling in. I used my Sigma 24-105mm Art lens at 95mm to get closer to the falls and compose the shot. A shutter speed of only 1/4 second shows both movement and detail in the water while keeping the ice razor-sharp.

This brings all of you up to date on what’s been going on over the last 45 days… I am really trying to get out more, shoot more and just enjoy nature in all aspects that I can. Tonight a friend and I are headed out to find clear dark skies and possibly old abandoned buildings to shoot the stars over.  Give me a follow on social media, leave a comment about this blog as I would love to  hear from you.

What’s next?  I don’t have any set plans for the rest of this month. I’ll just keep and eye out on the weather and go where it takes me. Next month I will be spending 2 nights/3 days at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. I am very excited about this and thankful for the opportunity to see the night sky from a different vantage point. I am getting ideas on how and what I want to shoot while I am there and if the weather is good then I will be sharing those images with you as well as doing a separate blog post.

Send me blog post ideas if you have something specific you’d like to hear my thoughts on or a photographic process you’d like to see.

In April we will start our Night Photography Workshops for the 2019 season. We’d love to have you join us. This year we are adding Yellowstone to our list of events and we only have 1 spot left on that workshop.

New Luminar from Macphun

kansas-gold

Luminar from Macphun is here! 

I will start out by saying that I have only had the program a few days. There is quite a bit to learn and I have only touched the surface. It’s been a fun ride so far.

Whenever I try out a new editing program there are a few criteria that the software needs to meet for me to continue using it.

  • Simple
  • Responsive
  • Fast
  • No Crashing
  • Effective

Simple – This means that once installed I can push some buttons, move some sliders and things will happen that I like. I don’t want to have to go searching for results.

Responsive –  This is a big one for me. When I make an adjustment with a slider I want the effect to happen as I am doing it or within 1 second of the adjustment… I have used other programs that take minutes to apply the adjustment and quite frankly I can’t live my life like that.

Fast – No lagging. As mentioned above things need to happen fast. I didn’t purchase a fast computer to run slow software.

No Crashing – When things start crashing I get nervous… With some of my more detailed night photography where I am using a lot of individual images to create one final image.. Putting in an hour or so worth of time and then have the program crash is a deal breaker for me, and probably you too, right?

Effective – It has to be able to do some nice things and produce some great results. If you bought a program only to find out it didn’t do what you wanted or give you the desired effects you like, you probably wouldn’t use it much. I have found that what I am doing with Luminar works very well and keeps my images very clean. This is extremely important because my images are printed large…I don’t want any artifacts from processing showing up in my images.

I am happy to say that Luminar has met and exceeded all my criteria. The software was easy to install the first time. It hasn’t crashed, it’s fast and responsive to the adjustments I make and it’s loaded with a lot of great presets to get you to a fantastic starting point quickly. I say “starting point” simply because there are still things I do in Photoshop when I am fine tuning my images and preparing them to be posted online.

Let’s take a look at some side by side comparisons with a few images I have processed with Luminar.

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Here is a nice side by side comparison of my RAW file on the left with the “Warm Sunset” preset on the right. That’s 1 click to this point. In PS you would need to do 2 or 3 individual adjustments to get to this point. Here I simply found the preset that most closely matched where I was headed with this image and selected it. I took this screenshot before I made any minor adjustments to the panel on the right because I wanted to show you the effect it had on the RAW file. As you can see in the very top image of this article I did finish off the image in PS before creating a file for posting online.

Screen Shot 2016-11-19 at 9.44.33 AM.png

center-of-attention-luminar

“Center of Attention” – This preset works great when you have a centered subject and you really want to put emphasis on your subject. This image is from 4 years ago and one that I never took the time to process before. As you can see from the Before and After and the final image underneath. All I did here was use the preset and then add a little warmth to the color tone and I was done… Less than 30 seconds to edit this image from start to finish. I want to spend more time out shooting when possible and less time editing so having a program that is this quick and easy to use really excites me.

Screen Shot 2016-11-19 at 9.23.43 AM.png

way-too-close-luminar

I could show you these side by sides all day. I think the best thing to do is try it for yourself and  Download the free trial and start creating your own amazing works of art.

If you wish to purchase Macphun Luminar <— click here this let’s them know you found it on my blog.

Please note that I do not get paid, or paid for anything that is in this blog. The opinions are my own and I am simply sharing then with you…  Will Luminar replace photoshop for me, probably not. It will become a very useful addition to my workflow. This program is extensive. You can use layer, masks, blend modes ect to create anything you want!

Transitions – Product Reviews – General Photography related stories

Welcome to a new resting place for me on the web. I hope you will enjoy your stay and find the blogs you read here to be informative and to your liking. This blog will be used to tell stories about my images, share product reviews and discus events that are happening in my photography world.

If you are new to my work let me get right to it and tell you a little about me. My name is Darren White. I own and operate Darren White Photography – Fine Art Landscapes based out of Littleton, Colorado. I have been in Colorado since 2013 and have felt quite welcomed here as the people are friendly and supportive. I am a native of the Pacific Northwest where I was born and raised. A lot of my work is from the Northwest in and around Oregon and Washington.

I am co-owner of Night Photography Workshop where we teach students how to shoot and process images of the night sky. Our work takes us to Wyoming where we teach in Grand Teton National Park, Utah where we teach in Arches and Canyonlands National Park and here in Colorado where we teach up on Mount Evans at over 14K feet above sea level. This keeps me pretty busy in the summer between late April and late September. I also do private workshops both on location and post processing.

my-million-star-hotel

I have been doing photography now for over 20 years and through the years I have seen a lot of things come and go. I started shooting back in the film days. Back then I was doing weddings, portraits, sports, animals, and anything else people would pay me for. I worked at our local 1 photo lab as well as the local newspaper in their darkroom and shooting high school sports as well. I got into landscapes when I was 16 and could drive to the beach. I was always fascinated by the ocean so that is where I spent a lot of my time. I grew to appreciate the sunsets, sunrises and any great weather we had that created a beautiful scene. Maybe it was a foggy morning where the sun was trying to burn through or fresh snow at sunrise. I took a good hard look at what was around me and always was able to find the beauty in what I was seeing.

Over the years I have learned through experience, trial and error and the constant effort to get better. I have worked with a lot of companies in various sectors covering many subjects on different levels. I will touch more on this later.

What I am doing now?  Aside from teaching in the summers I specialize in Fine Art Photographic Prints, Acrylic Prints, Metal Prints and Canvas Gallery Wraps. I have spent 20+ years working with various labs to find the best one for each product I offer. I feel I am in a very good place now with the companies I work with Artbeat Studios and Reed Art and Imaging do my HD Face Mount Acrylics depending on where my client is located. American Frame does all my Fine Art Photographic Prints over 20″ and Englewood Camera does all of my smaller prints up to 20″ long. Using these labs has provided me the best quality possible while being able to keep my prices affordable for my clients, customers and collectors. I have been using each of these labs for over 2 years and have built a great working relationships with them that I feel will continue for quite a while. 11228026_10206695695283655_993119726573377078_n

The above image shows some of the inner workings of American Frame – a smaller lab that puts out amazing quality prints. American Frame offers a lot of great paper choices. I have found that not all images look great on all papers. My image of Sunrise at Nubble Light above was printed on gorgeous Hahnemühle Photo Rag fine art paper. This paper allows the true beauty to come though and be appreciated to its full extent by the viewer.

Over the next few weeks I will be uploading some previously written blogs from other sites before I close them down. I will be adding new blogs, at least 1 a week, on all things photography. From software to cameras to lenses. I will also be uploading some tutorials as well. Please take a moment and subscribe to my blog to be updated when new blogs are up. Thank you!